The Project: Kuwait

Key Steps to Developing Pro-Athletes with Pro-Coach Paul Reddick: Building the Four Pillars of Performance, the Value of Good Genetics, and the Importance of Prehab and Rehab

January 12, 2020 Season 1 Episode 106
The Project: Kuwait
Key Steps to Developing Pro-Athletes with Pro-Coach Paul Reddick: Building the Four Pillars of Performance, the Value of Good Genetics, and the Importance of Prehab and Rehab
Chapters
The Project: Kuwait
Key Steps to Developing Pro-Athletes with Pro-Coach Paul Reddick: Building the Four Pillars of Performance, the Value of Good Genetics, and the Importance of Prehab and Rehab
Jan 12, 2020 Season 1 Episode 106
The Project Kuwait
welcome to this episode of the project, and in this episode I get to talk to Paul Red. He is a former Pittsburgh Pirates scope, and he has been coaching for over 20 years in the United States. He is a baseball and coach guru. What it takes
Show Notes Transcript

I am joined by Paul Rennick and most of you know that I have played baseball, coach, baseball, live, eat and breathe Boston Red Sox for most of my life. I found Paul a few years ago, I'd say probably about 2015 maybe 2013. I'm really not sure on the timeline, but you and Jeff Cavalier produced a program called Load to Explode, and it was for hitting. And I actually used that with a lot of my players found that to be extremely useful. And then I found the 90 mile an hour club, and everyone's probably thinking, What does this have to do with general fitness and everything, mainly because I mean Paul, you can probably talk about this a little bit more in baseball core strength, shoulder health, everything kind of aligns toe every other sport. So you want to talk about shoulder health and baseball, and I would say how that would translate to other sports.




welcome to this episode of the project, and in this episode I get to talk to Paul Red. He is a former Pittsburgh Pirates scope, and he has been coaching for over 20 years in the United States. He is a baseball and coach guru. What it takes

to make it is genetics to have it, and then they will tow, have self directed work to be able to put in that time when no one's looking and there's no outside

Support the show (https://www.instagram.com/p/Bl8NPB2H4Mf/?igshid=1m9w8d28oarlu&utm_source=fb_www_attr)

spk_0:
00:00
Theo Project brought. Wait, what you learn? Hey, everybody, welcome to this episode of the project, and in this episode I get to talk to Paul Red. He is a former Pittsburgh Pirates scope, and he has been coaching for over 20 years in the United States. He is a baseball and coach guru. What it takes
spk_1:
00:26
to make it is genetics to have it, and then they will tow, have self directed work to be able to put in that time when no one's looking and there's no outside
spk_0:
00:34
pressure. Your kids probably isn't gonna go to the majors and they're probably not gonna go broke, but they can have a good career. I think that seemed foreign point right there.
spk_1:
00:43
If you didn't create your son to be a major leaguer, there's not a whole lot. You're gonna be able to do the not genetic limitations.
spk_0:
00:49
It's sure that no matter how hard you work, yeah, it's so true. No matter how hard
spk_1:
00:53
you work directed work is, there's gotta be a point where the kid is working on his own and figuring things out in developing himself. So there's Kobe Bryant getting the janitor to open his high school gym at five in the morning so he could take 1000 shots if your son was made a major leaguer. There's a whole lot you could do to get in the way of that.
spk_0:
01:13
All this and more in today's episode. Hey, everybody, welcome to this episode of the project, and I am joined by Paul Rennick and most of you know that I have played baseball, coach, baseball, live, eat and breathe Boston Red Sox for most of my life. I found Paul a few years ago, I'd say probably about 2015 maybe 2013. I'm really not sure on the timeline, but you and Jeff Cavalier produced a program called Load to Explode, and it was for hitting. And I actually used that with a lot of my players found that to be extremely useful. And then I found the 90 mile an hour club, and everyone's probably thinking, What does this have to do with general fitness and everything, mainly because I mean Paul, you can probably talk about this a little bit more in baseball core strength, shoulder health, everything kind of aligns toe every other sport. So you want to talk about shoulder health and baseball, and I would say how that would translate to other sports.
spk_1:
02:09
So there's a ton I could say on that. Their coaches that are listening, one of the foundational things that I teach and I teach a lot of different things I teach. Obviously, my background is in coaching baseball players. I coach, fitness professionals, fit in gym owners, and I coach sports coaches on helping them be better. Coach is a coach, business owners as well. And in everything that I do, there's a foundational the least that I have, which applies to how we would train the body, too. So when people get into talking about specific body parts, I often think that's usually where our eyes go and what is important doesn't always get our attention. But what gets our attention is usually what we make important. And when you talk about arm health that gets our attention. I don't know that that's necessarily the most important thing, and it gets our attention mainly because that's where a lot of injuries show up. And just because that's where an injury localizes does not mean. That is where a medical professional will apply treatment because that's what a medical professional does, right? You're hurt. They fix the hurt. And so we could maybe talk about the difference between a medical professional does and what, you know, performance coaching does. So what I always look at somebody got a problem with their shoulder. There's a problem in this system. My background really was injured pitchers. That was my first mission. I was gonna rid the world of injured pitchers, and I was a performance consultant with ST Barnabus Hospital, which is a huge medical outfit here on the East Coast in the United States. HealthSouth and I don't know, probably that was another physical therapy and rehab places, and I worked hands on with about 600 injured pitchers. So from that, what I often found was that the an injury that a pitcher had or anyone had like this, where the injury localized but the problem somewhere else in the body. If you look a video of injured pitchers performing, you'll find a lot of commonalities in how they move, and so I look at it as a system wide problem and I don't know how we're going to go with this first
spk_0:
04:01
question. But wait, it's fine. We get a lot of trainers and a lot of physiotherapists that listen to the show in a lot of athletes that complain of shoulder injuries, elbow injuries and in all honesty, I always tell people you look at a baseball player. Most pictures injured their shoulder or their bicep or their forearm at some point in their career. And they usually have the best rehab methods honestly compared thio soccer players. What can they tell you about her and your shoulder, You know, have a flamed up breaking Allison how to bring the swelling down, You know what I mean? So so you could keep going with this. I mean, it's definitely years. I mean, I'm not gonna stop you, man.
spk_1:
04:37
So look at it like this. I always use the analogy of we're gonna build a building. And our athlete is a building. Even if you are the athlete, you are a building. So step one in building ability. If you and I were to go purchase land, we would have someone assess that land we would assess it for. Is there water running through this as their swamp is the ground too hard. Is it to soft? Is there sink holes in it, right. We would want to a stash the land. So Step one is to have fertile ground ground that you can build on. And as coaches, we are not equipped. And this Bob goes for anything goes for whether you're running a business, right? How about you need fertile ground and whatever you're gonna do, we're not qualified usually to assess that. So the first step is assessing fertile ground is a physical therapist the therapist who could do an assessment on you, top to bottom, inside out, left to right, front to back. And they tell you where you're strong territorial. We tell you where you may be your tweets, maybe where you have a low level injury or anywhere you're working around an injury. Athletes are great at doing at athletes or great at managing pain to so athletes usually don't know how good they feel until they started becoming healthy. They're just so used to dealing with pain. And so from there, that is step one. I would not touch an athlete unless they've gone to a physical therapist and I'll come back to the reason why for that, because what we really want to, I just want to pop the hood. You want to make sure that there's no restrictions of movement. There's no imbalances that would interfere in the instruction that we're trying to give. The second part in building a building is the architect. So that's me. That's you, right? We're coaches, right? Like I know how a pitching motion should go. You know how a squad dead lift all these things, right? You know how they should work. The mechanics of know how it should work and how it should function of what the result is. That's the architect. Now the architect is vital because the architect has division and the architect usually has the greatest relationship with the athlete, right? They're usually more connected to whatever the athletes doing. Third person is the builder, and that's what I would call the strength coach. Now the architect of the strength coach have tohave a marriage. They have to work together. The architect is going to say this is how it should work and this is what it should D'oh! Now he should go to the builder and say now build me this build me an athlete that can do this and can do this this many times. So in real simple formula, if I have a picture I want you're gonna go to the builder and say, Here's what his mechanic should look like Make sure that he's strong enough to read to, to pull off these mechanics. Now he's gonna have to pull off those mechanics 100 20 times a game every fifth day for 6 to 9 months. And he's always gonna be asked to throw Maur every year of his career is gonna be asked from. Or now the other job of the architect is yes. Roles also give the strength coach an idea of saying this is what he's gonna be doing this year, next year and the year after. So Akita pics of a baseball at eight years old today it's gonna throw about eight. He follows the pitch, count the limits. You know the recommendations to the letter will throw 18,000 bitches expecting the strength coach. We're working together, but we're building this kid for we obviously Max my term success, which is becoming increasingly more important. So we're not only preparing him for the 120 pitches every fifth day for 6 to 9 months for this year. But we're preparing him for the long haul, which is the 18,000 pictures that we wanted to throw effectively safely. Now, the fourth part is once the building's builds, you get a building manager and the building manager is make sure that the grounds are kept up, that the pipes are leaking, that the bathrooms are cleaned and at the maintenance is done on it. And so the building we thought all this time into now is kept up on the building. They're yours, your game coach, and that's a tougher relationship, the 1st 3 or a lot easier. The 1st 3 are super easy. You can definitely get those getting your game coach on the same page with all that is, the harder so what the athlete does or the coach does, or whoever is in roll. When you're looking at these four pillar, they'll have to work together, and one coach from these four aspects or off parent or an adviser or the athlete himself has to step out of that, and the athletes job is to play the orchestra Yeah, and to make sure that all four of these pillars work together. So there's a great line in the Steve Jobs movie where his partner, Steve Wozniak, they're having an argument. And he goes, Steve, Really? What is it that you d'oh, You don't write code? You don't make hardware. You don't do marketing. You don't do it. Is that what is it that you D'oh and Steve Jobs said. I play the orchestra, and that was basically him saying, like I know you write the code and you build the hardware and you do the market. But I'm the one who sees how it all works together. And so, ideally, there would be a coach or an adviser in the athletes, like if that would do that. But sometimes the athlete has to step out, be that for himself and have a look at all this. They have to play the orchestra for themselves, and it's the combination of all of those things that give the athlete the best chance to maximize whatever they have and then to obviously do it safely. So I'm a pitching coach by trade. You know, even I stopped what I do day to day anymore. But I teach a lot of pitching coaches, and the biggest fear of a pitching coach is that they're gonna lose credit. Yeah, I know that. Especially now, kind of the geeks are coming in right to baseball. And so the problem, though, is that if I have got a kid, all right, we'll teach. A thing called the power angle. Would maybe, if you want, I'll explain later, but but it requires the kid. Tohave is ankle to be functioning properly? Let's say I got a kid who's that? Ankle's just jammed up Whatever babies got less lights, brains, tweet is tight, whatever it is, and I'm trying to teach him power angle. I could have a bullhorn over his head. He could move in sleep on my couch. I could teach him every day that ankle's restricted. He's not gonna be able to do the instruction I'm trying to give him. But now if I can work with a physical therapist who could remove that restriction now, all of a sudden the athlete can use the instruction of giving him, and so that's how you maximize. If we're thinking in the best interest of our athletes that that's the way to do it, because now and then I don't know how much you follow American sports. But you know, I do this with my pitching coaches all time. Who won the last Super Bowl? Say Patriots? And who's the coach pages? Bella, check also. I'll give you your bucks. You could tell me who the strength coach of the Patriots is.
spk_0:
10:28
They had to get nobody. Okay, that's a good one, that somebody who's like live
spk_1:
10:33
unless someone really knows him. Nobody knows. Well, who's the physical therapist? Nobody knows who's the team doctor. No one knows. But I'll tell you who does know. Bill Belichick knows. Yeah, and Bill Belichick knows that those guys are as valuable to that tea than any of his coordinators, defensive or offensive coordinators. So go back to your question when somebody has shoulder health, I don't look at shoulder health. I think a lot of times the shoulder is what gets our attention. But what gets our attention that it was important and I think the shoulder usually takes want of a lot of bad preparation restrictions in movement, bad physical preparation, strength conditioning and poor mechanics, and you put all those things together, and then what's left to do? The work, the shoulder, what's holding the ball is that to do the work. So I think that's what ends up hurting Maur shoulders.
spk_0:
11:15
Yeah, that's a loaded answer that translates into, I think, all the sports that everyone listens to the show. To be honest with you, like I'm now into CrossFit, I do CrossFit basically full time. That's what I'm trying to do is an older athlete. So and a lot of that applies to CrossFit and every other sport. Like if you have restrictions, something's gonna compensate. When it overcompensates, you're doing more mileage on it. But when you grease the wheels properly as a phrase, then everything kind of work in tandem. So that's a great explanation of it. And I love what you're talking about when you're talking about having those four pillars and everything has to kind of come together, and the athlete needs to orchestrate it all or have someone do it for him. A lot of the times its parents. Nowadays, you see a lot of parents getting involved or it is the athlete. If they're older and a little bit more mature. So when we look at stuff like this, we look att. What goes into creating the best athlete? What does it actually take? Because used to be a assistant pro scout with the Pittsburgh Pirates. Right. So what does it take to get to the pros at any level in any sport, so to speak.
spk_1:
12:20
Okay, so there's I believe that there's a difference between truth and honesty, and I can give you an answer. That is the truth. It's not honest on. So the oddest answer is this. And this is not the most popular thing for parents to hear. Any time I'm in apparent roomful of parents, I start off with this. God makes the major leaguers. Yeah, And if your son now, whatever you believe, whatever faith back you're believing, right? Just using God as a creator.
spk_0:
12:47
Yeah, that's what
spk_1:
12:48
whatever faith you believe in. But God creates major leaguers. And if he created your son a major leaguer where he didn't, if he didn't create your son to be a major leaguer, there's not a whole lot you're gonna be able to do tow, not genetic limitations.
spk_0:
13:01
It's true that no matter how hard. You work? Yeah, that's so true.
spk_1:
13:04
No matter how hard you work. Now, if your son was made a major leaguer, there's a whole lot you can do to get in the way of that.
spk_0:
13:12
But what about the argument of like, Dustin Pedroia? L to ve these guys that genetically they're not gifted. We even Mugsy bugs. No, I just like those guys. Where would you put them in? How much work? How much effort went into that? Well,
spk_1:
13:26
there's a couple things. So I think anything that you're seeing on the professional level is a genetic major leaguer. So al two vacant generate power. I think I'm whatever. He has five cents. 57 I'm just below six foot. I don't think on my best day I could have ever generated as much power as Tuesday. So Al to of a Justin Petra. 10 months. Come on, guys. There major league, their genetic major leaguers in mauler bodies. That's all it is. So some people confuse the body size with somehow there's a limitation of talent, right? Where if you take there used to be a pitcher for the Yankees and Kyle Farnsworth, who looked like an athlete slash superhero slash supermodel right? He was like six foot five Jackie through 100 miles an hour. He was like your blue chip, like if you were making athletes, you'd make this guy. But here he was, pitching at the same time as a guy like Greg Maddux, who never lifted a weight in his life and never trained and great. But they're both genetic major leaguers, is just just in different body sizes. So when it comes to hard work, probably the best story could tell about hard work is every year. When I was coaching pictures year round, I used to have a special event where we would bring in like a college coach. We bring in someone from, like every level, like the one dy two d three and one year we brought in Fred Hill from Rutgers University, who just recent past way. But he said, how many parents? And this is all parents and players, you know, at this event, he said, how many of you parents think it's important that your kids work hard and all the hands go up and say, Keep your hands up? If you think I should evaluate your son on how hard he works and all the hand stayed up and he said, Put all your hands down at my level. Here's what it takes. You have to get the job done. You'll be able to do the job under field. Everyone at my level works hard. Working hard is not something special or unique at my level. And you could have heard a pin drop because they were just told the truth for the first time. So Dustin Pedroia works hard. Aaron Judge works hard. They're both genetic major leaguers. They're six foot two guys who look real good, who are not genetic major leaguers. And there's five foot six guys like Tuesday who maybe don't walk onto a field in turn everybody's head. But they are. And so it always comes down to two things. Number one is genetics is Do you have it right? The greatest, like, if you look, demonstration of genetics give you two examples. LeBron James has a brother, okay? And if you Google LeBron James, his brother, you think you're looking at LeBron James? I mean, he looks just like LeBron James. And when most people say when I tell most people LeBron James have a brother. They don't know he has a brother. And so, genetically, the same mix up.
spk_0:
15:48
We're not getting off track here. Process created both of them, right? Yeah. Bryce
spk_1:
15:53
Harper has a brother, but I don't know somewhere in the minor leagues who's actually a little bit bigger than he is. We're like, a little. So the way the genetics mix up is just It is just what it is sometimes. So number one is genetics. That's what helped you will make it Number two. If you take all these books, the talent code and all these books to try and tell us that there's some way to game the system of doing this they'll all say different things, most of which I disagree with. I think if you spent any significant I'm around athletes on a day to day level for a long period of your life, you would not agree with the 10,000 our rule players decide that they're ready to commit and change, and then they change and there was no 10,000 in there, 10,000 hours. There's something that's good for our instead. Kind of gives us hope that it's there. What all those books agree upon is this is genetic ability and then self directed work. So self directed work is there's gotta be a point where the kid is working on his own and figuring things out on developed himself. So there's Kobe Bryant getting the janitor to open his high school gym at five in the morning so he could take 1000 shots. There were stories of Manny Ramirez before there were batting cage and stuff used to get his friends cars and line them up so they could turn on the lights so he could take batting practice at night. It's things like that. What it takes to make it is the genetics to have it, and then the will tow have self directed work to be able to put in that time when no one's looking and there's no outside pressure. We're in an environment now where parents are trying to force that, and I tell like the parents, the best thing that you could do is wait is wait. And when he'll get more from the self motivated, self directed work, then he is going to get from you telling him get outside and shoot 1000 jumpers. And so those are the things that go into making athlete now on the genetic ceiling. You know, athletes when they hear that they go well, I don't have majorly genetics. Well, that's true. There's only been about 25,000 people in history of the last 140 years that had major league genetics. But that doesn't mean you can't have a great career. It doesn't mean you can have a great high school career. Doesn't mean that you can't have a great college career. Doesn't mean that you can't maybe you could get your education paid for. There's just that realism of that. So you know, those are the two things is you have to have the genetics and yeah, and self directed work has to come in at some point.
spk_0:
18:04
Glad you brought that up about genetics, and the self directed work is over here. I mean, we have a lot of people that have the mindset of Oh, if I just hire personal training for my kid, they're gonna get better at baseball and over equate. We have one practice a week, and then we have one game a week or sometimes two games during the weekend. So all in all the again, about five hours of baseball, five contact hours and then when these kids are going home, they're not even watching it. And they'll be like, All right, well, you know, I'm gonna hire Petey and they'll call me. They call it one of my friends and then they'll think they're gonna miraculously get better. It's like, No, it's like what you said to have that directive, work ethic and to know the truth that your kid probably isn't gonna go to the majors and they're probably not gonna go pro, but they can have a good career. I think that's the important point right there is. They could be. Still, they can still be successful at any level. They play it now. When you were scout. Just out of curiosity, cause I think this applies to a lot of sports, when did they start looking at kids to bring into their system or to bring into college? You probably know more about this than may, but if I was a scout in college and I wanted to sign a kid, when would I start scouting him out when I look at him when he's a junior in high school. Freshman, What's it like nowadays?
spk_1:
19:16
So I could tell you when I stop, like, totally stop. Generally the scouting that was generally done around juniors and seniors in high school or college players, and you might follow a kid. If you saw some kid who was a freshman software doing something or or maybe an eighth grader or something, you might write his name down and and follow him. And then sometimes you would see if you had a bunch of people on your list. And this is like a pen and paper, like a notebook, right? Build Scout's Notebook the way you attract those players as you would block book. So let's say I have to go see X y Z High School who's got like a kid who's a definitely a draft pick, and I got this freshman pitcher what I think is pretty solid. Let me see. Do they play each other? Can I go see them both at the same time? And one kid who might be developing the way it was the way it is now? I cannot speak with authority on that I can only speak on what I hear. And did you talk with a ton of people business? And I hear things as young as 12 years old. If there's, I know that there are scouting businesses that are measuring 40 yard dash and velocity on 9 10 11 year old kids. Zane. So it's hard to distinguish, I think, apparent to distinguish a business that is printed on the parents the spires wants and needs, or the parents not wanting to mess up a chance for their kid and what is actually used for a college program. So I know you'll hear a lot of colleges now to say, like we're not looking at, we're not looking at all these things were looking at really objective data and a lot of ways. The technology that has emerged in baseball in the last probably 7 to 10 years, we're now really getting good is actually more helpful to players. I think because now you're looking at a picture spin rate and you're looking at the hitters exit velocity and a launch angle and these air objective measurements. Yeah, right. So you may have a kid who I don't know goes to a tournament or showcase, and he goes over 10 right? But his exit Gilo was like 88 miles an hour average of, and he had a launch angle of this. Well, there's nothing wrong with you. Just didn't you got unlucky. You know, the game of baseball happened to him. You have pictures with spit and rate of this, and there's so much now objective data to look at a player. That and this is trickling down, moving extremely fast down the ranks of baseball. So there's parts of it that are. I think there's a no idea around baseball now that you can kind of play it like blackjack, like it's counting
spk_0:
21:44
cards. You get to
spk_1:
21:45
play the odds. You know, somebody made that argument in the thing I was listening to. The only problem with that is that there's 52 cards in a deck or however many year in the deck, right? So, yeah, you can count into that because there is a limitation to it. But in baseball there's, however, in a blackjack, there's 52 possibilities in baseball. There's infinite possibilities right of playing. The odds is great, and stuff like that But I think at some point there's there will be a stop to that technology that only useful to a certain point and then you're still gonna have to. Technology is not gonna help get a guy who's anxious or nervous back onto the field. It's not gonna get You gotta work hard. It's not going to get a guy who maybe should be competing at a different level to do that. You know, it was gonna take a human, inspiring another human to do that. But with scouting, I see that is really where it's going. So now there's good and bad with that. I think it's good because I think some players that maybe would have got missed before I get a chance. But I also think that sometimes people are looking just looking at that numbers and not looking at the player, not e at the guy. So there are intangibles. There are things that go into a locker room and go into a team that hopefully you know, all these things go in waves. Right? What'll happen is that technology would become so dominant that you know you'll have a clubhouse of guys that don't even look up from their locker room and don't talk. Then I'll swing back on the other side. That kind of bring in some people to get those intangibles, to get the team together to play together. Because it's not just a bunch of statistics and numbers and measurements playing against another group of statistics number the measurements. You know, people playing its people.
spk_0:
23:14
Yeah, yeah, let's understand. What's your perspective on? I'm just curious here because I talk about it with my buddies here all the time and we've all coached for a long time. I grew up around the game and my buddy Tad, he grew up around the game, too, and it's so different now. Back when we were kids and we had, like senior Babe Ruth's, there was Legion baseball there. There were only a handful of things. And now it's all these different travel teams and this and that and showcases. And it's almost turned into a business. It's almost turned into a cash cow for a lot of people. So how is that from your perspective? Talking about it are looking at that,
spk_1:
23:50
Yeah, I have some strong and certainly voiced feelings on it. We do. Ah, podcast, which is we're in the middle of the end of the season. Last year were done two seasons with Pocket called baseball Bats podcast. So I have a lot of opinions
spk_0:
24:02
on how I look and listen to it. I t. O
spk_1:
24:07
So the problem with it is this. There's always two tracks of development for players, and this is where I think long term baseball is going to really suffer. I think it is already starting to trickle up that way. You have kids like all my
spk_0:
24:20
phone. So sorry not not to cut you off, though, but I just want to state for the listeners that this doesn't only apply for baseball. I think this applies across a lot of sports and if you little baseball, baseball has kind of been the pioneer when it comes to sabermetrics and a lot of you don't know what that is. Go Google sabermetrics and you'll understand that baseball really initiated the numbers game for all sports. And I think baseball was the first sport that used batting averages and everything and you know, there's so many numbers in it, so just so everybody knows don't to now listen to this because it does apply. So yeah. Sorry, Paul. Go ahead.
spk_1:
24:56
Yeah, there's two tracks of development in everything we do in life in baseball. So Track one is the iPhone. So if I pull out our iPhones, I take a picture. That picture instantly developed right way have early on in baseball is we have 789 Your old player that are just early developers, obviously a two year standard deviation in growth. That's why you could have a nine year old that looks like a seven year old and a nine year old looks like an 11 year old. So what happens is a lot of the iPhone players quote unquote iPhone players. They get scooped up by Underqualified and incompetent coaches and mostly to win fake rings and plastic trophies. And they're not better players. There's early, develop their just develop faster. That's the deviation of years. The standard deviation is moving in their favor, so you have players that are just early developing players. They're just bigger, faster, stronger than the other kids. Now we'll come back to them in a second cause it causes a problem. Then you have the late developers which I would call the Polaroids. Right where you Polaroid picture For those who don't knows that you have to take a picture and then put it down. Wait for developed for about 1/2 hour and so late. Developers. The kids who are not bigger, stronger, faster. At 79 10 years old. What happens is that the Travel Ball team comes in and the coach, and there's also a little bit of an unholy relationship between paying to be on teams. Right? So, like we were kids, like, maybe my dad paid 30 bucks for the Little League. You know, a year to play a little eager. Some like that. Now it's anywhere from 3 to 5. I've heard upwards of 10 to $15,000. Wow, certain teams. There's an expectation. Yeah, there's an expectation on the coach now. Is not. The coach is not there to develop. Used to say like that Coach would need player to develop. Now we look at it is that players developed coaches. Coaches are looking for players to develop them. In other words, give me a bunch of stronger, faster kids and then I'll put him on a team and we'll win and I'll be a better coach because I assembled bigger, faster, stronger players. So the travel ball coach, who now? Because everyone's written a check to be on this team, there's incredible pressure for that coach to win. And so he doesn't have time to develop players. He needs players. He needs bigger, faster, stronger now. So now he's saying to the nine year old kid Is, It was a Polaroid saying, You know, you're a good kid and I like you, but I've gotta win six tournaments this year. I just don't have time. I don't have a roster spot to develop you. And so what happens is the late developing kid lacks competitive opportunities because they end up playing on local rec league stuff like that, which are diminishing.
spk_0:
27:19
Yeah, but
spk_1:
27:20
now the early developing kid early developing kid. He has plenty of competitive experience, but he hasn't developed skills the game and so what happens is now we're seeing at 13 and 14 we're seeing a lot of early developing kids that are under skilled and burned out and all of a sudden, when the bull hard right when kids start throwing curveballs and all of a sudden, you know, because they were 5 11 at nine years old. Now, all of a sudden they're 15. Everyone's 5 11 And all of a sudden what happens to the early developing players is that their greatest skill was that they were bigger, faster, stronger earlier than everyone else. And now, once that starts to even out, they don't know how to play because their greatest advantage was taken away from them, has been minimized, neutralized. And so what we're seeing is a lot. We're gonna miss out on a lot of Andy Pettitte's Don Mattingly's Jorge Posada's guys that were drafted in 25 26 27th round that not necessarily as kids were great baseball players. And what you're gonna end up with, I think, is a lot of Bryce Harper's. A lot of guys who were individuals, stat guys, they're me guys and look what happened to the Nationals. They lost their best player, won the World Series. Yeah, and so eventually that's what baseball is gonna end up fighting. Is this that really just hoping that they can get those players that aren't burned out and to be able to make something of them, but I think they're losing a vast generation of players too early. Developing players are getting burnt out and they're not developing as athletes. And the late developing players are not getting the opportunities to really develop that tournament step. That tournament scene and that whole tournament culture has created that situation.
spk_0:
28:50
That is a freaking amazing perspective, dude like that's That's a really good perspective. I never even thought of it that way or even looked at it from that perspective and were in Kuwait. So you can't blame me for that e like I'm not exposed to baseball's, which is I was used to, but that's a really good perspective on it. And the reason why I say that because we have Dubai has an amazing leak. They have a lot of good players That kid thrown probably plus 90 couple years ago. I mean, this kid was just throwing hard cheese and he got a full ride somewhere. But Dubai has a bigger mix of expats. Are Americans over there versus Kuwait, So they do have that talent pool, but you get some of the parents here that see that and they're like, Oh, my kids good in Kuwait, and I keep trying to remind them they're good in Kuwait. I played in Kuwait. Yeah, And then when I went to college and states, it was reality Check. It was a big reality check for me. You hit like 1 40 my first year. You know, juco because I'd never saw 80 mile an hour on 80 mile an hour fastball or good curveball. Took me a year Thio year with a lot of work in the cage just to catch up a little bit. So, you know, can you talk about that a little bit more in terms of the standards of leagues of playing? You said that the normal leagues that we had in the towns is kind of being diluted, and everyone's going towards travel ball or whatever. What's that gonna mean for the kids that can't afford travel ball? I'm saying this again across all perspectives baseball, football, basketball, soccer because you're seeing it in every sport. So what is this going to mean for the player later on that can't afford it?
spk_1:
30:26
I do think I was told a while ago. More of more than 18 months ago, I was told that within 18 months there was gonna be reform coming, too. The youth baseball scene. So it was more than 18 months. I was told, 18 months. I am hopeful that there will be some kind of reform that will come to this, that at least some way to that kids can't play on two or three travel teams and that there's gonna be funding to make sure that they're the local leads are better funded. I think so long we relied on organizations like Little League that were basically volunteer run organization.
spk_0:
30:57
Yeah, yeah,
spk_1:
30:58
that faded away. So I do think it will change for the player who's like 9 10 11 12 now I don't know that that's much hope for them. But what I do think is everything creates an opportunity. So I think about two years ago I did the whole baseball circuit of speeches and I talked about this. Two coaches exact thing that I think there's a massive business for players that just to offer baseball experience for players that are late developing players and players that want a sane option. So this comes as a surprise to most people, but my Children don't play baseball, and I don't care if they do or they don't. My job is not to make the baseball players. My job is to make them great men and so whatever. Choose whatever path they choose. That's their path. But people usually shocked at that and then explain to him, that's best reason. Number one is that I don't care what they dio that's up to them what they do, what's important to them, but they don't have to do with their dad did and secondly, is there's no saint option in my own. So when my son offered baseball, this was first grade baseball and it was three practices a week and then a game on Sunday, three hour and 1/2 practices. Now they're seven years old. I don't know what you're doing for an hour and 1/2 you know, 12 13 7 year olds, but three days a week and then Sunday morning. So Sunday morning we go to church. We're Christians, we live of Christian values in our home, and we go to church, and that's where we go. And that is that. So, as a family, we have values and those values air in my kid's room hung in my kid's room. There on my refrigerator, they are agreed upon. They are, you know, we talked about and they are encouraged. The top of our values in our home, everyone's different home is that we honor God and go to church. So if I throw out, I say, baseball's more important that if I throw out my first value, well, I might as well throw the rest of them out. You don't have to do your homework on time. You don't have to be respectful to others. You don't have to tell the truth. You don't have to be generous and giving the other. I will throw the rest of them out, too. So I'm in the same option. If there were a sane opportunity for my Children to play baseball, they would probably be in it. But there's not. There's just not one. And I thought for about seven seconds about creating one that I thought against it. But the other problem is to is that I want my kids to be in swimming in karate, in tennis and doing a vast array of other things. Well, three practices a week and in the first grade doesn't give me a lot of time. And so Mrs Reddick, baseball before it even got to Mister Ed. Um, relation of our family. Yeah, And so what? I think there's an opportunity is for people to create an option for late developing players and then people that want a sane option, which I think there are incredible amount of people that want a sane option. But they're with the insane option because that's the only one available to them. They would love to back it down a little and to not have it be so expensive. Been so time consuming and stuff like that because there's another thing to that. I think most of baseball people that get caught up in this don't understand. If you let's say you're a family of Greek, it's right. The commitment to travel baseball is massive. Yeah, and what happens with kids is that every year it gets a little bit more. The time the money gets a little bit more and the intensity goes up. And so when the kid plays these 89 10 he doesn't know, right kid? Right? But 10 11 they start thinking this is a little harder this year. That was last year and then 12. This is a lot harder than it was last year. I'm putting a more time. Then all of a sudden, like the kid turns 13 or 14 and I get calls from Dad's all week long there say, you know, all he wanted to do is play baseball now has said he wants to go to the ball with his friends and like something about girls. And I'm like, Okay, mother Nature, testosterone, that's
spk_0:
34:23
not you, That's,
spk_1:
34:24
Ah, lots of luck with that one. But here's the problem is that it's not that the kid doesn't love baseball anymore is that doesn't love it that much. As much as he wants to be a kid and do other things. And what happened, it would create this ongoing thing that makes it so hard to do and be anything else other than a baseball player. And what baseball coach is really miss. I think in the creation of this is that when you're actually got that family of free kids, when that older kid is 12 the others or 10 or eight or whatever and all the sudden. The commitment is to this travel baseball, which is all over the place. You're doing two things. You're separating the family in a lot of ways, never a good thing. And then all of a sudden, I get a lot of dads were calling me up saying, You know, we want to go to Disney World this year and the coach is telling us that if we're not at the department we had, you know, we had our Disney vacation booked for this time and I
spk_0:
35:11
don't know what
spk_1:
35:11
to Dio. I say, Tell the coach I can't say your family podcast But tell the coach to
spk_0:
35:16
You know, you go to Disney World, take your kids T o. You could say anything you want on this on this podcast by the Tell
spk_1:
35:23
the coach to go screw your coach. Go screw and go desirable. All right, because so what? Here's what happened is that this is very real for a lot of families. Is now all of a sudden the 12 kid. His activity isn't out, depriving the 10 and the eight year old siblings of their natural kind of going and doing things because they're such a time commitment. And when you start caning family vacations to do youth athletics, I think that's gone to a pretty bad spot.
spk_0:
35:49
Yeah, I mean, that gets pretty deep. I mean, I'd love to stay on this topic, but I want to switch gears a little bit just so we could get into some of the strength you talk a lot. Or actually, you had it a lot load to explore it about the core and how important the Corps was an activation exercises. And you also have kettle bells for baseball. So you've got to Really? Yeah, you got a deep fitness background also, And how would you say that translates to other sports terms of the court? Can you talk about the core for not only baseball but the other sports that are, You know, that that are mainstream, like soccer and basketball. And even I would say crossfit to that extent because there's a lot of Olympic weightlifting and there's a lot going on there. So your many years of experience you've seen the fitness industry developing the word core has been used so much so he talked about that a little bit
spk_1:
36:42
again. I these words of buzzwords, right? You know, a core is a great buzzword because people associate core with six pack abs and associates. Six pack abs with so many other things, the way I look at developing an athlete, and I'm just gonna preface by saying, I'm in no way an expert on strength conditioning, but I know what my limitations are, and I would save anyone's list. Thing is that there are tons of experts. And so I do work with people like we work with Jeff Cavalier and kettlebells of baseball. We worked with guys, one of my best friends. I called my uncle uncle my Uncle Mike's dailies about experts. So there's so much that we do where we collaborate with people who are the experts. And so I'm always looking at how, like so I'm an architect, right? So I'm always looking to have the athlete moves, and what I see from a lot out of athletes is I think you see players that let's just take a baseball pitcher who lifts his leg, his head goes back or his head goes down or he twists when he goes to pitch, or you see soccer player who can't turn, can't cut moral across athlete who can't cut or a volleyball player who maybe can't jobber. You know all these different things Or can't you rotate into Ah, serve And I'm always looking at at the movement that they're doing and usually to me, And I'm not expert. This is just the way I think about it. And it's been helpful to a lot. I think the first movement of any athlete really determines their level of connectedness, how connected there body is and at the core of that right? And so I think most people to misidentify the course. I look at the core from kind of like the top of the knees, all the way up to like the armpits. No, not just like, kind of ab exercise and stuff like that. So I'll tell you the best. Probably the best. The most useful illustration I've ever seen was there was a video that was talking about core strength and how important it is, And the evaluator was evaluating a boxer, M m a M m. A fighter kept getting knocked out, and he was good, like there was no reason why. I mean, just all this you'd be like, Who were the people knocking this guy out? He was just getting in a lot of use, getting himself in bad spots and fights. And so what they realized was that when he lifted his leg to kick, he urged his is upper body back a little bit too much, and that left like his jaw open like, susceptible to being hit. And I don't know much about fighting, but I know you hit the guy in the right spot and he can go down. And so that's what was happening. And so what they figured out was there. I had this guy looked like a Don ISS, right? He could be on the cover men's health, but yet and inefficiency in his core that when he lifted he didn't have sustained the height of his kick, and that altered his head and that head, and that left him open, being susceptible to a knockout punch. And to me, I thought that was the most fascinating look at just how important all this stuff ties together. That, to me is also will be talked about earlier that is the coach working with a physical therapist, strength trainer right, Because as a boxing coach, I don't know if you pick that up. You probably work on kicks, right? Everybody sees through their own lens. But when working together now you condone you are. We have to do these things. Why I collaborate. Because it's years I've called. You know, Jeff, who's a friend of mine's a yelling. I can't figure this out. We figure this out, or or a lot of the people that I know I coach about 50 fitness entrepreneur. So a little bit of access there. They can see things that we as coaches, just can't see. I could tell you another one to that, so I don't know. Job Franco. Jim Smith.
spk_0:
40:21
Yes. Yeah, yeah, I followed you to Frankly. Yep.
spk_1:
40:24
So they're two great friends of mine. And so Jim Smith, right? My best friend. And there was a guy doing a squat and like, we're clean it squat. I don't know the exactly I'm sorry, but it was kind of a crossfit tighten
spk_0:
40:36
movie clean. Yeah.
spk_1:
40:37
Yeah. And so guys, foot would shift when he lifted every time, the footage which would shift. And basically, if you looked at your gym, who's like, you know, genius. Looking at these, like now. This is not like a problem with his upper body. Strength is upper. Body strength is fine because Yankee in this whole thing up with his upper body strength. And he's like the guy can't He's not connected is like, not hooked up here and in baseball. The way we would describe that, that was to me. What was important about that was that was kind of the merging of like moving weight is moving weight. Yeah, whether you're moving a bar bell or a baseball baseball, the five ounce weight, it's a weight. So we say with a picture is a picture that doesn't have pictures. Let's say we're using, like, an analogy of voltage. Let's say a pitcher's got 100 volts of energy in his lower body 100 bolts in his upper body, but his core is 75 volts. Well, that 100 volts is coming up through, you know, through that kind of change. Can't pass 200 volts through 75 bolts burger. And so that to me, watching Jim Breakdown that lift of saying he's shifting that foot so he can get leverage because he doesn't have the core. His core strength is not is not able to transfer that energy up. So he's just moving his egg to gain a leverage position and like that was just fascinating today, and you should have him on your own. But so, like that, to me, is the core right is connectors thing that hooks up everything. So going in through, like, exercises and everything like that, I'd probably
spk_0:
42:00
destroyed you. Say his name was again
spk_1:
42:01
Jim Smith. James Smith. Yep, he's Jodi's partner. I can connect you with him.
spk_0:
42:05
That would be awesome. That'd be awesome to get him on here.
spk_1:
42:07
Yeah, yeah, So to me, that's the thing is that you got the coach is looking kind of at the movement in this movie. Doesn't work, right? What is it now? It's collaborating with someone who can say now, I don't know that a lot of shoes, Air Corps related or anything like that. I can't speak to that. But I've just been fascinated by those two examples of just that. They connected back to something that was really like we said, like, what gets our attention always Is it always important? I think, with the boxer like what gets our attention? Sky's getting knocked out right? And But that's not really. What was important was his core. This court is deficient in its core is what was causing him to be out of position to put him in that susceptible spot. So, you know, to me, I look at that. I think it's, I think when you're no jury or an athlete, and that's what you have to collaborate with so many different people that can spot those things.
spk_0:
42:49
No, that's actually a really good Ah, I mean, I'm glad you brought that up because we had Ruben Garcia, who's a movement specials here in Kuwait, and he was on, and he was talking about movement in the importance of having that team toe look at it from a different perspective because it is so important you'll spot something before I spot it. So I mean, that's so true, especially when it comes to the core. Now, what would you say, like if we were to talk about the court? Other than that, what would be like another go to muscle that you see that fails a lot for athletes? I don't want to say baseball specifically but across the board, because you have a decent background in that. But what muscle group would you say fails? A lot would be besides the core. Would you attribute it to you talked about ankle mobility earlier? And I know mobility is different than strength, but what are some other failing parts that you see this day and age compared to like, five or six years ago?
spk_1:
43:44
So in my experience, there's a lot of hip injuries. Now I look at it from a different perspective as faras like muscles and injuries. Something again we always for our own lens. I'll talk about it in my world of baseball just because I could make them. Yeah, coherent analogy is there, but that makes sense across the board. So I don't know that there are failing muscles as much as there are work loads that are just out of balance, Right? So I see. You know, certainly I have a lot of clients who were CrossFit gym owners, and they will tell you that there are athletes and their gym that they're working with. CrossFit athletes are working with that just trained too much, and they're not weak and they're not injured. But the only time that they're weak and injured is when they think they should train the way they think they should train. So there's nothing wrong with their body. It's just wrong with their workloads and their volume and their intensity, which would they're working out. So I think any time there's an injury I think you have to look at were so quick to say Well, then we need to repair that or that's weaker That's whatever. But was it only week is compared to the workers in the volume we were asking out of that athlete. Now they say that if you want to compete at a higher level, doesn't mean that you don't have to train to that level. But I'm always just very keenly aware of that because I work with a lot of business owners and so entrepreneurs and I'll tell you this. I have also I have, like wicked a DHD. I'm on medication, coaching whole thing like I haven't like from the strain of a DHD like
spk_0:
45:05
Theo initial like a strand,
spk_1:
45:07
and so the only time that I have a problem with my focus is when I think I should be focused all the time. But when I'm focused, I've had no problem focusing on this. You have no problem focusing on certain things. But it's when I have this idea that I should be focused all the time is when I struggle with focused when accept the idea that shouldn't be focused all time, kind of very freeing. So for an athlete to think, you know, should you be able to train high intensity every day well, that would be the reason why you're hurt, right? Because you have a belief that you should be training a high intensity every day when your body doesn't have that believe your break now or somebody thinks that they should perform at a certain level. So, I mean, to answer your question, Yeah, I don't know that I'm the most qualified to talk about
spk_0:
45:45
that. Understand? You kids developing now? I mean, I see it at least where Children are developing a lot differently than they were 10 years ago. And I think that was the root of my question of Do you see more tight kids with tighter hip so they can't move as much or you know the shoulders rounding forward or yeah, I mean, what do you see from your perspective over there?
spk_1:
46:06
I mean, hip injuries. I hear a lot of, and I think that a lot of that is just improper mechanics that are taught to talk to kids. I think that's what's called a little bit of that. And then, you know, there's the typical kind of shoulder elbow issues that it kind of always come up. But definitely there's like the hip thing is probably the biggest thing that I've noticed and the angelic When you're around, kids, like most of my career, coach hundreds of kids per year. You know when you hear something you don't hear a lot. The typical injuries on the guy Melville's list efforts for whatever you like. 13 year old kids should be having hip problems.
spk_0:
46:41
Yeah, you know, you know, I don't
spk_1:
46:43
know if that's just well again. I don't know if that goes back to the volume where the intensity that they're doing things I don't know, But that is definitely I've definitely heard Maura about the hips of late and then definitely in the last decade,
spk_0:
46:54
Yeah, that definitely makes sense, man. and taking up a lot of your time right now, and we really didn t. O. We don't get into any of the strength questions. I'd love to bring you back on so we could talk a little bit more in terms of the strength stuff, because those were some questions that I had lined up. And like I said before, like we kind of beer. If we veer off, it's cool, man. But if we do talk about strength, what are some of your favorite kettlebell exercises? Since you do have kettle bell for baseball, where some of the kettle bell exercises that generally you would pick is your faves?
spk_1:
47:24
So I generally work out with kettlebells mostly myself, because one of my best friends is a cattle bell guru, Mike Staley. So I think the kettle bell swing to may, I think, is just a perfect exercise in so many ways. I think any time you can load your posterior chain like that effectively, I think the are there so many benefits to it again, and I'm regurgitating here and no beans by an expert. But I definitely think there's when I'm consistent with my swings and I'm not consist of my strings. I definitely feel stronger and I think properly executed swing. It suggested a terrific exercise. Do you think people go too heavy sometimes with their swings? But I love that about swing. I also love a goblet squad holding the kettle bell from underneath, not on the horns. I know people have different ways, but for me personally, I like I almost feel like after I get done doing some about front squats like that, I almost feel like my whole body works better. And so that would definitely be go twos for May. And then I also think like Kettle Bell lunges are great. I think it's a pretty safe way, a toe load, a lunge I'm always very worried about. There's a lot of people in kind of my world that advocate for big, heavy lifting and stuff like that, and that's great, you know, and again every looks through their own lens, so they're looking to the blends of people coming into their gym and lifting big heavyweights, and that's great. But my lens is the kid who's in his garage.
spk_0:
48:49
Yeah,
spk_1:
48:50
because that's my reality. That's my kid is not in the gym with an expert who's writing a program and watching his loads and watching his rest and and training him right. I got a kid who's out there with some weights you got for Christmas, and it's amateur hour and kids get kids get hurt, All right? Sure. So I think that the more ways we can give kids safer ways to load the better. So I think like a reverse lunch with a kettle bell is another one. My favorite exercises. And I also like the thing is called a cost stock Cossack. Quite. Zach Squad Quiet. No, no, no. This is a kind of like when you're down. It was like a catcher. And you're doing your alternate
spk_0:
49:27
presses. Yeah, that's a Cossack squat. Yep. OK, ok. Yeah. So you go down to one side and strain out the other eye. Hell on the ground, toes pointed up. Yeah, yeah,
spk_1:
49:39
yes, I like that one. I think that for me is the really beneficial exercise. And then, you know, we had Dan John come and speak to our business group for which was, like, I had to my dream come true. In one year, I met that Dan John and Steve Qatar in the same year, which was pretty cool. And
spk_0:
49:56
Steve Carter, who wrote Rise of Superman.
spk_1:
49:58
No, Steve Carter. Who's the Kettle Bell? Expert?
spk_0:
50:01
All right, Wrong guy. You
spk_1:
50:05
should look him up. I mean, if you want about a freak of nature, he is a freak of nature. I mean, he's just flipping and catching 28 kettlebells just flipping up in here after him. Like as if. Yeah, he is an absolute freak nature. So I love also farmer walks. I lived on Berries. I think they're just great. So sometimes, like a great mix up from me. And it's just doing, like, walks and carries, you know, with overhead and then racked and then holding it down by my side. So those are my favorite.
spk_0:
50:31
I mean, there's definitely a lot you could do. Kettlebells. I mean, my go to is and I do this for my warm ups is usually a windmill. I love it. I think it's like one of the best warms up, so all right, I'm gonna switch gears again a little bit and let's go into a rotational movement. You have low to explode and you know There's a lot of rotational movement in baseball, and a lot of my training are a lot of my strength. Training when I was in baseball season was, you know, throwing a med ball and rotating the hips and doing would chops with, like, a band or something. So how important do you think rotational movement is for general health, not just for sport.
spk_1:
51:05
I'm going to be a couple of resource is, too. I think that are really, really smart about this. There was a study that came out that in rotational athletics, any rotational athletics, tennis, volleyball, golf, baseball that 80% of the power came from rotational movement, which I agree with. But the problem waas that all the tests were done with a preset lower half. In other words, if we put your lower half in the right position and then we ask you to rotate, 80% of it comes from rotation, that's great. That's assuming we can get to that optimal position, right? That's a tennis player who maybe can't get his feet right. You are golfer who's at it, you know it's future, out of position or weak or a baseball pitcher or hitter that can't get his foot down into the right position. So all of that, I think, is important. I would probably differ everything that I would say about rotation to a guy that I don't know. But I've been following and they use a lot of products. His name is David Dweck, and he invented the bow soup all okay, and he has a couple of products that would really be helpful to your athletes. She's got this. It's called Warranty Rope, which is basically trains using your last and getting into a rotation of figure eight. Motion of rotation. They get at these hands. They're not weights, but they're kind of like shakers that are like designed for your hand. But he is. He's fun. I mean, he's a lot of fun. He's definitely character, but he's also brilliant. I'll probably differ most of that to watch him. He has a real interest in baseball and he's got these clubs called and I worked out with all this stuff's getting close with the R M T club, which so to me I think when you're looking at like rotated your just like training in Africa rotation, I would say that you definitely want to do in multi planes. You want to do it in multi directions, and you want to make sure that your training both sides equally. I think that is a huge. You tell the kid you give a medicine ball time with her against the wall, he's gonna throw it against the wall like his dominant way. So I think in any of those movements definitely has to be multi plane, multi directional. I also think, too, that all of your rotational work should be done under your feet. I think especially for an athlete, I think when we get down on the ground and do too much stuff, I think we kind of just we separate. Disconnect that transfer of energy through the kinetic chain. I think all that should be down on your feet. But you should check out David West, check out his insert. It's entered it. At the very least, it is super entertaining.
spk_0:
53:20
I definitely will, and everyone's gonna crucify me because you came on and you're a fan of the boats, a ball. I shit on the most of all time. I hate it. I don't e that boat I mean, I'm very honest and all the guys that listen to the podcast that know me, they're really like, See, you had someone say that most of all is actually useful. I'm like, damn it. Okay, well, I I don't
spk_1:
53:41
use I can't really speak to thee. I don't use most of all myself, so I can't speak. He just invented it. So, you know, that was just but But the stuff he has now, I think is really, really helpful.
spk_0:
53:50
That's that's awesome. Like, definitely gonna check him out. Like I've been writing a bunch of names down as you've been speaking, you know, just to kind of, like, follow up on some of these guys later on, they'll probably be in the show. Notes also do. Thank you very much. And what we've been doing lately is we kind of do like a little rapid fire segment towards the end. Kind of Okay, wait. Goofy questions. First thing that pops into your head. All right, so if you could explore space of the ocean, which one
spk_1:
54:14
of the ocean? I was in the Coast Guard auxiliary. Four years. I'll go into the ocean.
spk_0:
54:18
All right. Dead lift. or squat and why? And you could only do we owe your life
spk_1:
54:23
dead lift because you get Thio, you get to drop
spk_0:
54:27
it. That's good. There's nothing like that sound
spk_1:
54:31
when you when you got and then you let it go and there's a certain amount of weight that hits the ground. It's just right, right?
spk_0:
54:36
Yeah. No understandable bands or dumbbells off bands, bands. All right, um, I like that's what about what about cattle? Bellow, Dumbbells, Kettle, Kettle bell. All right, if you had to play one support for the rest of your life and it can't be baseball, American football or hockey or basketball, what sport would you play tennis? That finishes
spk_1:
54:57
my absolute favorite sport to play?
spk_0:
54:59
That's a good one. That was a quick answer on tennis, man. E gotta give you credit books. People of Texas plates
spk_1:
55:04
on it. It's a I had a friend who was fresh tennis player and introduced me to the game when I was 22 yeah, I mean, like, it's far as like, if you I would definitely. Tennis is my favorite sport to play it just to me. I feel like it uses all the things that I learned in baseball. You like a faster pace.
spk_0:
55:23
Okay? Yeah. Vegan or carnivore for the rest of your life.
spk_1:
55:27
So that's an easy question. Because right now I am. In two months, two of the carnivore diet was the only thing I care beef, salt and water. And we go down a long rabbit hole with this one. But I I have had some pretty crazy results. Carnivore diet over the last, like, 40 days. Well,
spk_0:
55:44
I'm interested right now. So what results have you seen? Like, I've wanted to try it, but I don't have the guts to do it. So, like, what Have you seen?
spk_1:
55:51
Yeah. So I do. Another podcast with former clients got him. Ryan Muncie. We do a podcast called going 567 Which is just kind of conversations that we have that we record. And so he did the carnivore diet, and so I just did it. I just I had Dunvegan for 30 days, and I felt fine. It was okay that it's like, God, let me go the other way. Let me see how that works. And so I didn't need to really lose weight. I didn't feel that wasn't like a goal of mine. But I've lost £8 in that 1st 40 days, and I have no desire for any kind of junk food whatsoever. So we're now in Christmas season here. My wife is baking dozens and dozens of cookies. That's your thing is we'll give out cookies to our neighbors and friends like that. And I've had two cookies, mainly because I was just in the wrong moment. Wrong time, just hungry. But even on Thanksgiving I had some stuffing and stuff like that. But I didn't have nearly the meal like I'd probably about 30% of the meal that I normally would have. I have no desire for ice cream, junk food or anything, and it's very, very weird. It's weird to say, Like when I was doing vegan, I would have licked a pack of raw bacon like
spk_0:
56:57
I would have like a like I wasn't desire
spk_1:
56:59
ing any of that. But with this, it's just really hard to describe. You don't miss. It is the desire is just not there. And my energy is good, everything's good. I'm gonna get my blood work done in after Christmas. And so We'll see. But
spk_0:
57:12
do you feel do you feel that you had, like, a jack up in testosterone at all? Like I mean, when I go heavy on meats, I eat red meat, like all the time. And if I don't eat red meat, I feel sluggish. I feel crappy if I'm just eat chicken. So how can you gauge the range of your testosterone on a good day or a bad air?
spk_1:
57:29
I don't know. I'm l know. When I get my my blood panel back, if it's got up, I do feel I do require less sleep. I do have more motivation to work out. So those air usually signs of more motivation and activity to area to do that. Usually Stein's a test ash from going on, but yeah, I've never tried all kinds of different guys. I've never had something quite like this. Just And if the blood work comes back fine and everything's good, I'm gonna watch it. I mean, you know. Yeah, probably stay with it.
spk_0:
57:57
No, I meant I got a more personal question for you if you're prepared. Tea. Oh, hey, this is this is very have the poop spent because we we all know like, uh, you go, like, low carb and all that shit that it just kind of you get the constipation and whatever, but how's it been for you? Because some people don't Some people have the opposite, so it is different. Okay, you help. It is different. I'll take your word for
spk_1:
58:23
it is definitely a change in. How do I say it's coming out quicker?
spk_0:
58:28
Okay. All right. All right. Let's go. That's cool. Look, my co host, Meg, she's our gut health experts, so that's probably a question she would Don't go ask you, and we're actually having a colon. Doctor, Come on. Our show. In the future, we'll talk about it. I called the poop doctor at the gym, So, uh, that was like So what qualifies a good poop and what's constipation? He's like, Do you know this is like, Can you come on? The show is like, Asher. I was like, All right, we'll have a show all about what your bowels should actually be doing. So that's great. Sorry about that personal question, but I had to ask me, probably give me. I always try and give the listers as much insight as possible. So, Hee, I guess everybody knows you really well right now. Dude, I hope you've got back on the show in the future. Would love to have you back on. It was definitely some great conversation about coaching. I think that was the highlight of this. We kind of stayed away from the, you know, the fitness stuff. Just really that your four pillars? I think that's great. And I think that's something a lot of coaches and athletes need to look at. So Thanks, man.
spk_1:
59:28
Yeah, absolutely no problem. I'm super happy to D'oh.
spk_0:
59:32
Thanks for listening to this episode. If you enjoyed it, please head overto iTunes to subscribe rape and leave a review. You can also find us on Instagram at the project. Cool. Thank you. And join us next time.
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